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Deboss

Smart Impression

Tuesday July 15, 2014

MYM tag

 

Giving Pledge

 

Olsen Violins

 

As is the case with many great discoveries, Letterpress printing as it is practiced today (with impression,) is the result of accident. Traditionally, anything more than the kiss of type to paper was considered an error that required adjustment. While other forms of printing became faster and more convenient, Heidelberg presses became more or less obsolete. These presses may not have been built to keep up with digital, but they are the perfect tool to print with impression, which has given them an even more elevated status than when they were new.

Modern Letterpress adds a dimension to printing that is unique. Print can be experienced by touch as well as just sight. With that in mind, it is tempting to push the impression to its absolute limit, but a smart printer knows that it’s far better to choose the appropriate amount of “push” for job. Impression for Impression’s sake is an amateur mistake.

Taking a nuanced approach to impression requires addressing a few things.

First, the designer must take a few steps to make the piece look great when printed. Make sure that the letter spacing and leading is exaggerated. This helps with legibility when the words arepressed into the sheet and prevents the lines of type from looking like solid valleys between the leadingAlso, consider the design as a whole. Does any artwork back up to the artwork onthefront? If so, the impression from one side will negate the impression on the other in the places where the artwork backs up.

Secondly, the printer must evaluate the design and decide how to pack the tympan of the press to get the best-looking impression. Packing with soft paper will give the printed artwork a deep impression with soft shoulders, while packing with hard film will give a more refined impression with harder shoulders. These are generalizations of course, and all depend on variables in the job as a whole and the paper on which it’s being printed. Many jobs require complex packing arrangements that bring out the best in the different elements of the design.

Our Heidelberg presses are the best in the biz, and with great power comes great responsibility. We approach each letterpress piece we print with care and we’ll always choose the smartest way to make it look it’s best.

James Beard Menu

Wednesday April 27, 2011

Subtlety can have a big impact in print. James Beard utilized sophisticated detail to make this special occasion menu stand out. The palm border was created with a blind deboss which adds varying degrees of dimension and detail, and is combined with letterpress in a cool teal shade to add the feel of tropical elegance. We chose 118# Savoy Natural White for this piece for its softness and malleability. 100% cotton makes this paper a great medium for the impression of deboss and letterpress.

Nordstrom’s PONCHO

Friday February 25, 2011

Nordstrom Marketing designed this exclusive invitation for Poncho and we think it has the WOW factor a deboss can deliver. To ensure maximum deboss WOWness for the logo we went with a copper die, which has very hard chiseled edges that allow for a super clean impression. Paper was also key: something too light would tend to buckle, so we used Savoy 236# cover from Reich Paper. 236# Savoy is super heavy and is 100% cotton, this was the first job run on the new 236# Savoy cover and we were really impressed how it absorbed the deboss strike.

Texture, texture, texture!

Friday February 4, 2011

Here at Evolution Press we believe there is a fine line between fashion and print. Where there is form, texture, and color, there is inspiration.

Since the invitation for The Bravern’sevent Fashion’s Night Out uses color and texture, our client, Square Tomato, wanted a premium paper that would show off their design. They chose 179# Crane’s Cover in Fluorescent White – a hefty cotton sheet that provides great stability for multiple press runs.  First, we laid the Spot colors down on our offset press.  Next, we debossed both sides of the sheet -including the fine texture of a woman’s scarf and the top of her couture gown- which created a voluptuous, tactile look.  The final touch came when we die-cut the card to give it its elegant, rounded corners.  It’s the fine detail that makes this piece not just unique but a stand-out.